Candle Hat

Work in Group Exhibitions

Painting, Sculpture
Candle Hat

Candle Hat

2014
string, rope, card box, straw mat, and steel street sweeper on pine
203.2 x 162.56 cm (80 x 64 in) 

 

MAXIMALISM
Contemporary Fine Arts - CFA Berlin

May 02 - Jun 07, 2014

 

With Borden Capalino, Sachin Kaeley, Sam Moyer, Kaari Upson

 

RACHMANIRAMDASS I

RACHMANIRAMDASS I

2014
aluminum, enamel oil, acrylic, spray paint and wire on steel
213 x 211 cm / 84 x 83"

 

MAXIMALISM
Contemporary Fine Arts - CFA Berlin

May 02 - Jun 07, 2014

 

With Borden Capalino, Sachin Kaeley, Sam Moyer, Kaari Upson

RACHMANIRAMDASS II

RACHMANIRAMDASS II

2014

aluminum, enamel oil, acrylic, spray paint and straw mat on steel
234 x 188 cm / 92 x 74"

 

MAXIMALISM
Contemporary Fine Arts - CFA Berlin

May 02 - Jun 07, 2014

link

 

With Borden Capalino, Sachin Kaeley, Sam Moyer, Kaari Upson

Backwater Bit Coiner

Backwater Bit Coiner

2014
Enamel, rope, and cardboard
67 x 10 in.

WHITE COLUMNS BENEFIT EXHIBITION

May 3 – May 17, 2013

link

The Karl Holmqvist Project:
 As a part of the 2014 Benefit we have commissioned 23 artists – including Klara Liden, Adam McEwen, Elizabeth Peyton, and Wolfgang Tillmans – to create a new work in response to a recording by Karl Holmqvist. 

Recliner

Recliner

2014

sawdust, obsidian, mica, oil enamel on canvas,

20 x 18 inches

 

NEW YORK WOMEN

Gspot Gallery, Houston, TX

April 5-27, 2014

link

Curated by Barbara MacAdam, New York Women features a quirky group of contemporary artists who engage with the visceral world of materials and nature as well as the ethereal realms of the intellect and spirit. 

Dance TV

Dance TV

2014

oil, acrylic, linen, medium, a/v tape and wood on straw mat,

24 x 18 inches

 

NEW YORK WOMEN

Gspot Gallery, Houston, TX

April 5-27, 2014

link

Curated by Barbara MacAdam, New York Women features a quirky group of contemporary artists who engage with the visceral world of materials and nature as well as the ethereal realms of the intellect and spirit. 

Eve's First Confusion Between Penises and Snakes

Eve's First Confusion Between Penises and Snakes

2012
String, sawdust, wood, enamel, dye and snakeskin
284.5 x 241.3 x 15.2 cm
(112 x 95 x 6 in)

 

THE SPACE WHERE I AM

Blain|Southern
17 July 2014 – 27 September 2014

link

The exhibition’s title is taken from philosopher Gaston Bachelard’s book The Poetics of Space (1958), which describes the lived experience of space and where he contended “it is better to live in a state of impermanence than in one of finality”. All of the assembled works examine the dialectic between absence and presence, primarily valuing absence in the construction of form.

Installation View - THE SPACE WHERE I AM 2014

Installation View - THE SPACE WHERE I AM 2014

THE SPACE WHERE I AM

 

Blain|Southern
17 July 2014 – 27 September 2014

link

The exhibition’s title is taken from philosopher Gaston Bachelard’s book The Poetics of Space (1958), which describes the lived experience of space and where he contended “it is better to live in a state of impermanence than in one of finality”. All of the assembled works examine the dialectic between absence and presence, primarily valuing absence in the construction of form.

  Liberti(n)es   Open Space Baltimore  January 19th – February 23rd, 2013   Link   As humans, we are granted certain liberties. As citizens, we often take these liberties for granted. It is assumed that we have control (agency) over these liberties. But what happens when we lose this control or surrender this agency, willfully or not?  The works that comprise Liberti(n)es are what makes this middle-ground area of extremism in moderation what it is; they are not joy rides, they are not car chases, they are slow strolls down back alleyways, revealing realities we often ignore, deflect, or suppress.

Liberti(n)es

Open Space Baltimore

January 19th – February 23rd, 2013

Link

As humans, we are granted certain liberties. As citizens, we often take these liberties for granted. It is assumed that we have control (agency) over these liberties. But what happens when we lose this control or surrender this agency, willfully or not?

The works that comprise Liberti(n)es are what makes this middle-ground area of extremism in moderation what it is; they are not joy rides, they are not car chases, they are slow strolls down back alleyways, revealing realities we often ignore, deflect, or suppress.

Naturalist Graffiti Transfer Portrait (N.G.T.P. 1)

Naturalist Graffiti Transfer Portrait (N.G.T.P. 1)

2013
enamel, spray paint, sawdust, wood and string
86 x 60 inches

 

THE NEW SINCERITY

Lora Reynolds Gallery

September 7- November 2, 2013

link

Lora Reynolds is pleased to announce The New Sincerity, a group exhibition of work by Florian Baudrexel, Colby Bird, Rosy Keyser, Roy McMakin, Julia Rommel, and Fabrice Samyn. 

The ethos of the present moment: is it defined by irony? Sincerity? Young, highly educated, trendy people don conspicuous mustaches or trucker hats, pursue esoteric hobbies like taxidermy or raising pigs for artisanal bacon, and eschew everything mainstream: appropriating and recontextualizing low culture in pursuit of erudite individuality. Advertisements self-deprecatingly acknowledge themselves as ads, beckon viewers to laugh at the futility of the medium, and at the same time rake in revenue. But the six artists in The New Sincerity provide a foundation for a more nuanced reading of the current cultural temperature.

Big Sugar Sea Wall

Big Sugar Sea Wall

2012

PAINTER PAINTER

The Walker Museum, MN

February 2- October 27, 2013

link

Painter Painter presents new work by 15 artists from the US and Europe in a focused survey of emergent developments in abstract painting and studio practice. With an expanded series of public programs, it also considers the ever-shifting role of the painter in contemporary art and culture, which remains as fluid as the medium itself.
The exhibition posits abstract painting today as a means, not an end. For these artists, painting is a generative process—one that is rooted in the studio yet open and receptive to the world. Here new languages of abstraction and eccentric methods of making are freely pursued, crossing paths with sculpture, poetry, film, music, performance, design, publishing, craft, and fashion. Thus painting becomes a conduit—a way to make contact beyond the closed frame of their formal invention.

Installation View: Moby Dick

Installation View: Moby Dick

2012

Enamel, spray paint, polycarbonate, aluminum, wood on found, rolled steel
260 x 215 x 27 cm

 

Painting in the 2.5th Dimension

Zabludowicz Gallery, London

May 23 - August 11, 2013

link

The group exhibition includes works from the Collection that explore the expanded territory of traditional 2-dimensional painting. With works by artists from the US including Tauba Auerbach, Jessica Dickinson, Sam Falls, Alex Hubbard, Nathan Hylden, Rosy Keyser, Michael E. Smith and Ned Vena, the exhibition looks at practices that involve a supplemental dimension to painting, whether that is photography, sculpture, printmaking or time-based interactions with painting. These works strain at the boundaries of painting's history and physicality, suggesting a metaphysics of painting, which the exhibition will explore.

Moby Dick

Moby Dick

2012

Enamel, spray paint, polycarbonate, aluminum, wood on found, rolled steel
260 x 215 x 27 cm

 

Painting in the 2.5th Dimension

Zabludowicz Gallery, London

May 23 - August 11, 2013

link

The group exhibition includes works from the Collection that explore the expanded territory of traditional 2-dimensional painting. With works by artists from the US including Tauba Auerbach, Jessica Dickinson, Sam Falls, Alex Hubbard, Nathan Hylden, Rosy Keyser, Michael E. Smith and Ned Vena, the exhibition looks at practices that involve a supplemental dimension to painting, whether that is photography, sculpture, printmaking or time-based interactions with painting. These works strain at the boundaries of painting's history and physicality, suggesting a metaphysics of painting, which the exhibition will explore.

Moby Dick (detail)

Moby Dick (detail)

2012

Enamel, spray paint, polycarbonate, aluminum, wood on found, rolled steel
260 x 215 x 27 cm

 

Painting in the 2.5th Dimension

Zabludowicz Gallery, London

May 23 - August 11, 2013

link

The group exhibition includes works from the Collection that explore the expanded territory of traditional 2-dimensional painting. With works by artists from the US including Tauba Auerbach, Jessica Dickinson, Sam Falls, Alex Hubbard, Nathan Hylden, Rosy Keyser, Michael E. Smith and Ned Vena, the exhibition looks at practices that involve a supplemental dimension to painting, whether that is photography, sculpture, printmaking or time-based interactions with painting. These works strain at the boundaries of painting's history and physicality, suggesting a metaphysics of painting, which the exhibition will explore.

Moby Dick (detail)

Moby Dick (detail)

2012

Enamel, spray paint, polycarbonate, aluminum, wood on found, rolled steel
260 x 215 x 27 cm

 

Painting in the 2.5th Dimension

Zabludowicz Gallery, London

May 23 - August 11, 2013

link

The group exhibition includes works from the Collection that explore the expanded territory of traditional 2-dimensional painting. With works by artists from the US including Tauba Auerbach, Jessica Dickinson, Sam Falls, Alex Hubbard, Nathan Hylden, Rosy Keyser, Michael E. Smith and Ned Vena, the exhibition looks at practices that involve a supplemental dimension to painting, whether that is photography, sculpture, printmaking or time-based interactions with painting. These works strain at the boundaries of painting's history and physicality, suggesting a metaphysics of painting, which the exhibition will explore.

Installation View: Eve’s First Confusion Between Penises and Snakes

Installation View: Eve’s First Confusion Between Penises and Snakes

2012

String, sawdust, wood, enamel, dye and snakeskin

254 x 254 cm

 

Painting in the 2.5th Dimension

Zabludowicz Gallery, London

May 23 - August 11, 2013

link

The group exhibition includes works from the Collection that explore the expanded territory of traditional 2-dimensional painting. With works by artists from the US including Tauba Auerbach, Jessica Dickinson, Sam Falls, Alex Hubbard, Nathan Hylden, Rosy Keyser, Michael E. Smith and Ned Vena, the exhibition looks at practices that involve a supplemental dimension to painting, whether that is photography, sculpture, printmaking or time-based interactions with painting. These works strain at the boundaries of painting's history and physicality, suggesting a metaphysics of painting, which the exhibition will explore.

Eve’s First Confusion Between Penises and Snakes

Eve’s First Confusion Between Penises and Snakes

2012 

String, sawdust, wood, enamel, dye and snakeskin 

254 x 254 cm

 

Painting in the 2.5th Dimension

Zabludowicz Gallery, London

May 23 - August 11, 2013

link

The group exhibition includes works from the Collection that explore the expanded territory of traditional 2-dimensional painting. With works by artists from the US including Tauba Auerbach, Jessica Dickinson, Sam Falls, Alex Hubbard, Nathan Hylden, Rosy Keyser, Michael E. Smith and Ned Vena, the exhibition looks at practices that involve a supplemental dimension to painting, whether that is photography, sculpture, printmaking or time-based interactions with painting. These works strain at the boundaries of painting's history and physicality, suggesting a metaphysics of painting, which the exhibition will explore.

Portrait Painter, Space Case

Portrait Painter, Space Case

2013

Enamel, straw mat, raffia, rope, beer can, nails, and spray paint on canvas

86 x 68 inches

 

TONE POEM

Halsey Mckay Gallery 

June 1 - 18, 2013

link 

HALSEY MCKAY is pleased to present Tone Poem, a group show featuring five artists that will occupy both floors of the gallery. The exhibition introduces itself with seemingly humble materials–weathered wood, lacerated sheetrock, plastic bags, sawdust and adobe ground are all utilized as starting points. Between the hands of this group, these familiar components undergo varying acts of subtle restraint and active intervention. A variety of possibilities emerge from the materials themselves and to the potentials of painting, printmaking and sculpture. Seemingly unrelated objects begin to reveal similar appreciation and understanding of these artists’ worlds and rituals. An undercurrent of inventiveness, economy of means and commitment to hands-on approaches shines through. The tinkering of human presence abounds creating a splintered and ethereal narrative–at once plausible, eerie and at peace.

Installation View

Installation View

TONE POEM

Halsey Mckay Gallery 

June 1 - 18, 2013

link

HALSEY MCKAY is pleased to present Tone Poem, a group show featuring five artists that will occupy both floors of the gallery. The exhibition introduces itself with seemingly humble materials–weathered wood, lacerated sheetrock, plastic bags, sawdust and adobe ground are all utilized as starting points. Between the hands of this group, these familiar components undergo varying acts of subtle restraint and active intervention. A variety of possibilities emerge from the materials themselves and to the potentials of painting, printmaking and sculpture. Seemingly unrelated objects begin to reveal similar appreciation and understanding of these artists’ worlds and rituals. An undercurrent of inventiveness, economy of means and commitment to hands-on approaches shines through. The tinkering of human presence abounds creating a splintered and ethereal narrative–at once plausible, eerie and at peace.

 

To Swallow the Sea

To Swallow the Sea

2011
dye, house paint, sawdust and a/v tape on canvas

 

HEAT WAVES

Peter Blum Chelsea, New York

July 5 – July 27, 2012 

link

Pull the Trance in After You

Pull the Trance in After You

2011
copper spray paint and house paint on linen
80x 64 in (203.2 x 162.6 cm)

 

HEAT WAVES

Peter Blum Chelsea, New York

July 5 – July 27, 2012

website

 

Eve’s First Confusion Between Penises and Snakes

Eve’s First Confusion Between Penises and Snakes

2012
String, sawdust, wood, enamel, dye and snakeskin
284.5 x 241.3 x 15.2 cm
(112 x 95 x 6 in)

SCIENCE ON THE BACK END

Hauser & Wirth New York, 69th Street

1 May – 16 June 2012

link

Including works by:

Larry Bamburg
Marc Ganzglass
Rosy Keyser
Erin Shirreff
Nick van Woert

Ray (x-ray)

Ray (x-ray)

2012
Steel, string, hemp, enamel and dye
254 x 203.2 x 10.2 cm / 100 x 80 x 4 in

 

 

SCIENCE ON THE BACK END

Hauser & Wirth New York, 69th Street

1 May – 16 June 2012

link

Including works by:

Larry Bamburg
Marc Ganzglass
Rosy Keyser
Erin Shirreff
Nick van Woert

Son House Shuffle

Son House Shuffle

2012
Enamel on metallic and rice paper
72.4 x 45.7 cm / 28 1/2 x 18 in

SCIENCE ON THE BACK END

Hauser & Wirth New York, 69th Street

1 May – 16 June 2012

link

Including works by:

Larry Bamburg
Marc Ganzglass
Rosy Keyser
Erin Shirreff
Nick van Woert

Poem for a Stutterer

Poem for a Stutterer

2012

Sawdust, ink, enamel, twine, and blanket on birch panel

82 x 65 1/2 inches

 

Luis Camnitzer, Robert Kinmont, Rosy Keyser, and Linda Matalon

Simone Subal Gallery

July 5 to August 3, 2012

link

This intergenerational exhibition examines the way people and objects relate to their immediate environment.  It presents work that explores human physicality both conceptually as well as literally.  Central to the exhibition is the potential of specific gestures.  These acts, whether poetic or corporeal, reveal the manner in which simple interventions alter one’s sense of his or her surroundings.

Dislocation Station

Dislocation Station

2012

Tarp, enamel, graphite, spray paint, can tabs, collage, and wire on canvas

86 x 68 inches

 

Luis Camnitzer, Robert Kinmont, Rosy Keyser, and Linda Matalon

Simone Subal Gallery

July 5 to August 3, 2012

link 

This intergenerational exhibition examines the way people and objects relate to their immediate environment.  It presents work that explores human physicality both conceptually as well as literally.  Central to the exhibition is the potential of specific gestures.  These acts, whether poetic or corporeal, reveal the manner in which simple interventions alter one’s sense of his or her surroundings.

Dislocation Station (detail)

Dislocation Station (detail)

2012

Tarp, enamel, graphite, spray paint, can tabs, collage, and wire on canvas

86 x 68 inches

 

Luis Camnitzer, Robert Kinmont, Rosy Keyser, and Linda Matalon

Simone Subal Gallery

July 5 to August 3, 2012

link

This intergenerational exhibition examines the way people and objects relate to their immediate environment.  It presents work that explores human physicality both conceptually as well as literally.  Central to the exhibition is the potential of specific gestures.  These acts, whether poetic or corporeal, reveal the manner in which simple interventions alter one’s sense of his or her surroundings.

Dislocation Station (detail)

Dislocation Station (detail)

2012

Tarp, enamel, graphite, spray paint, can tabs, collage, and wire on canvas

86 x 68 inches

 

Luis Camnitzer, Robert Kinmont, Rosy Keyser, and Linda Matalon

Simone Subal Gallery

July 5 to August 3, 2012

link

This intergenerational exhibition examines the way people and objects relate to their immediate environment.  It presents work that explores human physicality both conceptually as well as literally.  Central to the exhibition is the potential of specific gestures.  These acts, whether poetic or corporeal, reveal the manner in which simple interventions alter one’s sense of his or her surroundings.

Installation View- MIRIAM BÖHM, ROSY KEYSER, AND ERIN SHIRREFF 2011

Installation View- MIRIAM BÖHM, ROSY KEYSER, AND ERIN SHIRREFF 2011

MIRIAM BÖHM, ROSY KEYSER, AND ERIN SHIRREFF

Lisa Cooley 

June 26-August 12, 2011

link

The works of Miriam Böhm, Rosy Keyser, and Erin Shirreff, while formally and visually distinct, share a nuanced exploration of visual perception and the subjective excesses it enables. This tendency exists on a wide-ranging continuum between the three artists. In their own meticulous ways, they give the viewer multiple perspectives within a single work that gradually lends itself to a perceptual dislocation. In the works of Miriam Böhm this occurs more literally through photographic representations – multiple photographic vantage points and narrative spaces exist in a single frame. In Erin Shirreff’s collage works made from cut-out book pages, familiar yet mysterious sculptures of unknown provenance are bifurcated and reassembled, creating a new image that intimates a visually cohesive object that never quite arrives. Meanwhile Keyser’s large abstract paintings and sculptures negotiate perspective through their hands-on materiality – paint is utilized as a sculptural material, making the works simultaneously function as abstract landscapes and representational forms. Shared forms of gesture and engagement also unite these varying aesthetic strategies. Even as each artist’s works in the exhibition provide divergent singularities, the larger dialogue concerns the perceptual vagaries that gradually emerge.

Installation View- MIRIAM BÖHM, ROSY KEYSER, AND ERIN SHIRREFF 2011

Installation View- MIRIAM BÖHM, ROSY KEYSER, AND ERIN SHIRREFF 2011

MIRIAM BÖHM, ROSY KEYSER, AND ERIN SHIRREFF

Lisa Cooley 

June 26-August 12, 2011

link

The works of Miriam Böhm, Rosy Keyser, and Erin Shirreff, while formally and visually distinct, share a nuanced exploration of visual perception and the subjective excesses it enables. This tendency exists on a wide-ranging continuum between the three artists. In their own meticulous ways, they give the viewer multiple perspectives within a single work that gradually lends itself to a perceptual dislocation. In the works of Miriam Böhm this occurs more literally through photographic representations – multiple photographic vantage points and narrative spaces exist in a single frame. In Erin Shirreff’s collage works made from cut-out book pages, familiar yet mysterious sculptures of unknown provenance are bifurcated and reassembled, creating a new image that intimates a visually cohesive object that never quite arrives. Meanwhile Keyser’s large abstract paintings and sculptures negotiate perspective through their hands-on materiality – paint is utilized as a sculptural material, making the works simultaneously function as abstract landscapes and representational forms. Shared forms of gesture and engagement also unite these varying aesthetic strategies. Even as each artist’s works in the exhibition provide divergent singularities, the larger dialogue concerns the perceptual vagaries that gradually emerge.

Edo Paraphrase

Edo Paraphrase

2011

Enamel, dye, twine, coat hanger and sawdust on canvas

49 x 44 inches

MIRIAM BÖHM, ROSY KEYSER, AND ERIN SHIRREFF

Lisa Cooley 

June 26-August 12, 2011

link

The works of Miriam Böhm, Rosy Keyser, and Erin Shirreff, while formally and visually distinct, share a nuanced exploration of visual perception and the subjective excesses it enables. This tendency exists on a wide-ranging continuum between the three artists. In their own meticulous ways, they give the viewer multiple perspectives within a single work that gradually lends itself to a perceptual dislocation. In the works of Miriam Böhm this occurs more literally through photographic representations – multiple photographic vantage points and narrative spaces exist in a single frame. In Erin Shirreff’s collage works made from cut-out book pages, familiar yet mysterious sculptures of unknown provenance are bifurcated and reassembled, creating a new image that intimates a visually cohesive object that never quite arrives. Meanwhile Keyser’s large abstract paintings and sculptures negotiate perspective through their hands-on materiality – paint is utilized as a sculptural material, making the works simultaneously function as abstract landscapes and representational forms. Shared forms of gesture and engagement also unite these varying aesthetic strategies. Even as each artist’s works in the exhibition provide divergent singularities, the larger dialogue concerns the perceptual vagaries that gradually emerge.

Lean to Cuneiform (detail)

Lean to Cuneiform (detail)

2011

Acrylic, oil, enamel, and paper on canvas

88 x 70 inches

MIRIAM BÖHM, ROSY KEYSER, AND ERIN SHIRREFF

Lisa Cooley 

June 26-August 12, 2011

link

The works of Miriam Böhm, Rosy Keyser, and Erin Shirreff, while formally and visually distinct, share a nuanced exploration of visual perception and the subjective excesses it enables. This tendency exists on a wide-ranging continuum between the three artists. In their own meticulous ways, they give the viewer multiple perspectives within a single work that gradually lends itself to a perceptual dislocation. In the works of Miriam Böhm this occurs more literally through photographic representations – multiple photographic vantage points and narrative spaces exist in a single frame. In Erin Shirreff’s collage works made from cut-out book pages, familiar yet mysterious sculptures of unknown provenance are bifurcated and reassembled, creating a new image that intimates a visually cohesive object that never quite arrives. Meanwhile Keyser’s large abstract paintings and sculptures negotiate perspective through their hands-on materiality – paint is utilized as a sculptural material, making the works simultaneously function as abstract landscapes and representational forms. Shared forms of gesture and engagement also unite these varying aesthetic strategies. Even as each artist’s works in the exhibition provide divergent singularities, the larger dialogue concerns the perceptual vagaries that gradually emerge.

Lean to Cuneiform

Lean to Cuneiform

2011

Acrylic, oil, enamel, and paper on canvas

88 x 70 inches

MIRIAM BÖHM, ROSY KEYSER, AND ERIN SHIRREFF

Lisa Cooley 

June 26-August 12, 2011

link

The works of Miriam Böhm, Rosy Keyser, and Erin Shirreff, while formally and visually distinct, share a nuanced exploration of visual perception and the subjective excesses it enables. This tendency exists on a wide-ranging continuum between the three artists. In their own meticulous ways, they give the viewer multiple perspectives within a single work that gradually lends itself to a perceptual dislocation. In the works of Miriam Böhm this occurs more literally through photographic representations – multiple photographic vantage points and narrative spaces exist in a single frame. In Erin Shirreff’s collage works made from cut-out book pages, familiar yet mysterious sculptures of unknown provenance are bifurcated and reassembled, creating a new image that intimates a visually cohesive object that never quite arrives. Meanwhile Keyser’s large abstract paintings and sculptures negotiate perspective through their hands-on materiality – paint is utilized as a sculptural material, making the works simultaneously function as abstract landscapes and representational forms. Shared forms of gesture and engagement also unite these varying aesthetic strategies. Even as each artist’s works in the exhibition provide divergent singularities, the larger dialogue concerns the perceptual vagaries that gradually emerge.

 

Lean to Cuneiform (detail)

Lean to Cuneiform (detail)

2011

Acrylic, oil, enamel, and paper on canvas

88 x 70 inches

MIRIAM BÖHM, ROSY KEYSER, AND ERIN SHIRREFF

Lisa Cooley 

June 26-August 12, 2011

link

The works of Miriam Böhm, Rosy Keyser, and Erin Shirreff, while formally and visually distinct, share a nuanced exploration of visual perception and the subjective excesses it enables. This tendency exists on a wide-ranging continuum between the three artists. In their own meticulous ways, they give the viewer multiple perspectives within a single work that gradually lends itself to a perceptual dislocation. In the works of Miriam Böhm this occurs more literally through photographic representations – multiple photographic vantage points and narrative spaces exist in a single frame. In Erin Shirreff’s collage works made from cut-out book pages, familiar yet mysterious sculptures of unknown provenance are bifurcated and reassembled, creating a new image that intimates a visually cohesive object that never quite arrives. Meanwhile Keyser’s large abstract paintings and sculptures negotiate perspective through their hands-on materiality – paint is utilized as a sculptural material, making the works simultaneously function as abstract landscapes and representational forms. Shared forms of gesture and engagement also unite these varying aesthetic strategies. Even as each artist’s works in the exhibition provide divergent singularities, the larger dialogue concerns the perceptual vagaries that gradually emerge.

Installation View- A PAINTING SHOW

Installation View- A PAINTING SHOW

A PAINTING SHOW

Harris Lieberman Gallery, New York

May 6 - June 4, 2011

link

Harris Lieberman is thrilled to announce the opening of A Painting Show in a temporary location on the ground floor of 508 West 26th Street. This group exhibition includes 35 artists and charts spheres of influence among a group of painters with diverse artistic approaches. All the artists share a rigorous conceptual grounding and an interest in the act and materiality of painting. They translate and transform art historical, philosophical, and lyrical ideas into works that invite both analytic and sensory consideration, while requiring our utmost engagement.

  A PAINTING SHOW   Harris Lieberman Gallery, New York  May 6 - June 4, 2011   l  ink   Harris Lieberman is thrilled to announce the opening of A Painting Show in a temporary location on the ground floor of 508 West 26th Street. This group exhibition includes 35 artists and charts spheres of influence among a group of painters with diverse artistic approaches. All the artists share a rigorous conceptual grounding and an interest in the act and materiality of painting. They translate and transform art historical, philosophical, and lyrical ideas into works that invite both analytic and sensory consideration, while requiring our utmost engagement.

A PAINTING SHOW

Harris Lieberman Gallery, New York

May 6 - June 4, 2011

link

Harris Lieberman is thrilled to announce the opening of A Painting Show in a temporary location on the ground floor of 508 West 26th Street. This group exhibition includes 35 artists and charts spheres of influence among a group of painters with diverse artistic approaches. All the artists share a rigorous conceptual grounding and an interest in the act and materiality of painting. They translate and transform art historical, philosophical, and lyrical ideas into works that invite both analytic and sensory consideration, while requiring our utmost engagement.

Blue Hour

Blue Hour

2010
dye and enamel on hemp, fringe, and steel
71.1 x 61 cm (28 x 24 inch)

I can’t forget but I don’t remember what
Sophie Bueno-Boutellier, Rosy Keyser & Karin Suter

Freymond Guth Fine Art, Zurich, Switzerland
30 October – 24 December 2010

website

Taking a Leonard Cohen quote as a loosely formulated starting point, this exhibition introduces the work of three artists of the same generation that show formal and ideal proximities. Notions of volatility, memory and process- oriented formulation are
substantial elements in a comprehensive installation that puts the individual works, mainly made on the occasion of this exhibition into a tension- generating relation. 

 

Stolen Paintings and Long Shots

Stolen Paintings and Long Shots

2010
primer, housepaint, linen collage, pins and nails on linen
H 228,6 x B 182,9 cm (h 90 x w 72 inch)

I can’t forget but I don’t remember what
Sophie Bueno-Boutellier, Rosy Keyser & Karin Suter

Freymond Guth Fine Art, Zurich, Switzerland
30 October – 24 December 2010

website

Taking a Leonard Cohen quote as a loosely formulated starting point, this exhibition introduces the work of three artists of the same generation that show formal and ideal proximities. Notions of volatility, memory and process- oriented formulation are
substantial elements in a comprehensive installation that puts the individual works, mainly made on the occasion of this exhibition into a tension- generating relation. 

Sensual Grindstone

Sensual Grindstone

2010
dye, housepaint, sawdust on linen
H 76,2 x B 61 cm (h 30 x w 24 inch)

I can’t forget but I don’t remember what
Sophie Bueno-Boutellier, Rosy Keyser & Karin Suter

Freymond Guth Fine Art, Zurich, Switzerland
30 October – 24 December 2010

website

Taking a Leonard Cohen quote as a loosely formulated starting point, this exhibition introduces the work of three artists of the same generation that show formal and ideal proximities. Notions of volatility, memory and process- oriented formulation are
substantial elements in a comprehensive installation that puts the individual works, mainly made on the occasion of this exhibition into a tension- generating relation. 

Self Low Light

Self Low Light

2010
graphite, skate top, dye, house paint, wire on linen
H 76,2 x B 61 cm (h 30 x w 24 inch)

I can’t forget but I don’t remember what
Sophie Bueno-Boutellier, Rosy Keyser & Karin Suter

Freymond Guth Fine Art, Zurich, Switzerland
30 October – 24 December 2010

website

Taking a Leonard Cohen quote as a loosely formulated starting point, this exhibition introduces the work of three artists of the same generation that show formal and ideal proximities. Notions of volatility, memory and process- oriented formulation are
substantial elements in a comprehensive installation that puts the individual works, mainly made on the occasion of this exhibition into a tension- generating relation. 

N.S.W., 1 (left) & Pillbox (right)

N.S.W., 1 (left) & Pillbox (right)

N.S.W., 1 (left)
2010
found material, enamel, obsidian on canvas
H 55,9 x B 45,7 cm (h 22 x w 18 inch)

Pillbox (right)
2010
housepaint, spray enamel, charcoal on canvas
H 55,9 x B 45,7 cm (h 22 x w 18 inch)

I can’t forget but I don’t remember what
Sophie Bueno-Boutellier, Rosy Keyser & Karin Suter

Freymond Guth Fine Art, Zurich, Switzerland
30 October – 24 December 2010

website

Taking a Leonard Cohen quote as a loosely formulated starting point, this exhibition introduces the work of three artists of the same generation that show formal and ideal proximities. Notions of volatility, memory and process- oriented formulation are
substantial elements in a comprehensive installation that puts the individual works, mainly made on the occasion of this exhibition into a tension- generating relation. 

Panoramic Delay

Panoramic Delay

2010
Dye, enamel, woodprint, spray paint on linen
80 x 64 inches

IMMATERIAL

Ballroom Marfa, Texas

October 1, 2010- February 20, 2011

website

Ballroom Marfa is pleased to announce the opening of Immaterial, an exhibition that will focus on the physical and psychic tensions between form, color, and space across varied visual and structural mediums. Curated by Executive Director Fairfax Dorn, the exhibition seeks to examine the metaphysical aspects of artistic production through a selection of artworks that challenge the use of material and space, formalism and abstraction. By using the exhibition as a forum to consider process-driven practices, Immaterial will consider art’s potential to transcend conscious states through a plurality of visual languages. 

 

Moving Version Variation (Desert Collage)

Moving Version Variation (Desert Collage)

2010
Dye, spray paint, rope print on canvas
68 x 60 inches

IMMATERIAL

Ballroom Marfa, Texas

October 1, 2010- February 20, 2011

website

Ballroom Marfa is pleased to announce the opening of Immaterial, an exhibition that will focus on the physical and psychic tensions between form, color, and space across varied visual and structural mediums. Curated by Executive Director Fairfax Dorn, the exhibition seeks to examine the metaphysical aspects of artistic production through a selection of artworks that challenge the use of material and space, formalism and abstraction. By using the exhibition as a forum to consider process-driven practices, Immaterial will consider art’s potential to transcend conscious states through a plurality of visual languages. 

Stick Chart, One Mile Elevation

Stick Chart, One Mile Elevation

2010
Dye, acrylic, spray enamel, and nails on metallic linen
22 x 18 inches

IMMATERIAL

Ballroom Marfa, Texas

October 1, 2010- February 20, 2011

website

Ballroom Marfa is pleased to announce the opening of Immaterial, an exhibition that will focus on the physical and psychic tensions between form, color, and space across varied visual and structural mediums. Curated by Executive Director Fairfax Dorn, the exhibition seeks to examine the metaphysical aspects of artistic production through a selection of artworks that challenge the use of material and space, formalism and abstraction. By using the exhibition as a forum to consider process-driven practices, Immaterial will consider art’s potential to transcend conscious states through a plurality of visual languages. 

Interior of Planetarium for the Absentminded

Interior of Planetarium for the Absentminded

2010
Steel, paint, and obsidian
35 1/2 inches, diameter of 23 inches

IMMATERIAL

Ballroom Marfa, Texas

October 1, 2010- February 20, 2011

website

Ballroom Marfa is pleased to announce the opening of Immaterial, an exhibition that will focus on the physical and psychic tensions between form, color, and space across varied visual and structural mediums. Curated by Executive Director Fairfax Dorn, the exhibition seeks to examine the metaphysical aspects of artistic production through a selection of artworks that challenge the use of material and space, formalism and abstraction. By using the exhibition as a forum to consider process-driven practices, Immaterial will consider art’s potential to transcend conscious states through a plurality of visual languages. 

Promethian Arrangement (Variation II)

Promethian Arrangement (Variation II)

2009
Dye and spray paint on linen
84 x 60 in

ALMOST

Curated by Lance Goldsmith

Nichelle Beauchene Gallery

December 10 – January 17, 2010

website

The exhibition examines questions of stability, as an element contended with, battled against or consciously sought in contemporary art practice. Engaged in both formal aspects of object making and the conceptual layer of artistic production, ALMOST is an exploration of suspension and fragility; it places the viewer into a state of anticipation. Each of the artists participating in ALMOST utilize a variety of found, natural and manufactured materials that may be fragile in and of themselves, in their use, or in their juxtaposition with other elements. The works presented inhabit a tenuous space; they are at once static objects, while simultaneously offering the illusion of material and conceptual collapse. 

  ALMOST   Curated by Lance Goldsmith  Nichelle Beauchene Gallery  December 10 – January 17, 2010   website   The exhibition examines questions of stability, as an element contended with, battled against or consciously sought in contemporary art practice. Engaged in both formal aspects of object making and the conceptual layer of artistic production, ALMOST is an exploration of suspension and fragility; it places the viewer into a state of anticipation. Each of the artists participating in ALMOST utilize a variety of found, natural and manufactured materials that may be fragile in and of themselves, in their use, or in their juxtaposition with other elements. The works presented inhabit a tenuous space; they are at once static objects, while simultaneously offering the illusion of material and conceptual collapse. There are a number of historical precedents for such work. Cezanne's "finished/unfinished" works are but one example. These works, rather than presenting themselves as competed paintings and drawings--a conceit that in Cezanne's time, was an inherent part of the artist-viewer contract--challenged the notion of finality in art making. Whether the works are or were meant to be completed is a continuing subject of art historical debate, and only further complicates the discussion. The controversy begs a question that is three-fold; whether an artist chooses to present a work as “finished”, whether the viewer perceives a work to be finished, and what completion or lack thereof does to our notion of experiencing art in an exhibition setting. In the twentieth century, Richard Serra's Prop sculptures address some of the same questions.

ALMOST

Curated by Lance Goldsmith

Nichelle Beauchene Gallery

December 10 – January 17, 2010

website

The exhibition examines questions of stability, as an element contended with, battled against or consciously sought in contemporary art practice. Engaged in both formal aspects of object making and the conceptual layer of artistic production, ALMOST is an exploration of suspension and fragility; it places the viewer into a state of anticipation. Each of the artists participating in ALMOST utilize a variety of found, natural and manufactured materials that may be fragile in and of themselves, in their use, or in their juxtaposition with other elements. The works presented inhabit a tenuous space; they are at once static objects, while simultaneously offering the illusion of material and conceptual collapse. There are a number of historical precedents for such work. Cezanne's "finished/unfinished" works are but one example. These works, rather than presenting themselves as competed paintings and drawings--a conceit that in Cezanne's time, was an inherent part of the artist-viewer contract--challenged the notion of finality in art making. Whether the works are or were meant to be completed is a continuing subject of art historical debate, and only further complicates the discussion. The controversy begs a question that is three-fold; whether an artist chooses to present a work as “finished”, whether the viewer perceives a work to be finished, and what completion or lack thereof does to our notion of experiencing art in an exhibition setting. In the twentieth century, Richard Serra's Prop sculptures address some of the same questions.

Installation View- Nichelle Beauchene Gallery

Installation View- Nichelle Beauchene Gallery

ALMOST

Curated by Lance Goldsmith

Nichelle Beauchene Gallery

December 10 – January 17, 2010

website

The exhibition examines questions of stability, as an element contended with, battled against or consciously sought in contemporary art practice. Engaged in both formal aspects of object making and the conceptual layer of artistic production, ALMOST is an exploration of suspension and fragility; it places the viewer into a state of anticipation. Each of the artists participating in ALMOST utilize a variety of found, natural and manufactured materials that may be fragile in and of themselves, in their use, or in their juxtaposition with other elements. The works presented inhabit a tenuous space; they are at once static objects, while simultaneously offering the illusion of material and conceptual collapse. There are a number of historical precedents for such work. Cezanne's "finished/unfinished" works are but one example. These works, rather than presenting themselves as competed paintings and drawings--a conceit that in Cezanne's time, was an inherent part of the artist-viewer contract--challenged the notion of finality in art making. Whether the works are or were meant to be completed is a continuing subject of art historical debate, and only further complicates the discussion. The controversy begs a question that is three-fold; whether an artist chooses to present a work as “finished”, whether the viewer perceives a work to be finished, and what completion or lack thereof does to our notion of experiencing art in an exhibition setting. In the twentieth century, Richard Serra's Prop sculptures address some of the same questions.

 

 Works by Ian Pedigo, left and right, and Rosy Keyser      STUBBORN MATERIALS   June 29 – August 25, 2007 at Peter Blum Chelsea  Larry Bamburg, Jonah Freeman/ Michael Phelan, Nick Herman, Rosy Keyser, Jutta Koether, Ian Pedigo, and Heather Rowe  Curated by Simone Subal  Stubborn Materials features eight New York-based artists who use materials in a paradoxical manner in order to reinvigorate the interpretive possibilities of abstract art. These artists place attention on a particular detail or an overlooked element as a means to reorient the reading of the work. Their formal decisions investigate the metaphoric and narrative potential of materials.

Works by Ian Pedigo, left and right, and Rosy Keyser

 

STUBBORN MATERIALS

June 29 – August 25, 2007
at Peter Blum Chelsea

Larry Bamburg, Jonah Freeman/ Michael Phelan, Nick Herman,
Rosy Keyser, Jutta Koether, Ian Pedigo, and Heather Rowe

Curated by Simone Subal

Stubborn Materials features eight New York-based artists who use materials in a paradoxical manner in order to reinvigorate the interpretive possibilities of abstract art. These artists place attention on a particular detail or an overlooked element as a means to reorient the reading of the work. Their formal decisions investigate the metaphoric and narrative potential of materials.

  STUBBORN MATERIALS   June 29 – August 25, 2007 at Peter Blum Chelsea  Larry Bamburg, Jonah Freeman/ Michael Phelan, Nick Herman, Rosy Keyser, Jutta Koether, Ian Pedigo, and Heather Rowe  Curated by Simone Subal  Stubborn Materials features eight New York-based artists who use materials in a paradoxical manner in order to reinvigorate the interpretive possibilities of abstract art. These artists place attention on a particular detail or an overlooked element as a means to reorient the reading of the work. Their formal decisions investigate the metaphoric and narrative potential of materials.

STUBBORN MATERIALS

June 29 – August 25, 2007
at Peter Blum Chelsea

Larry Bamburg, Jonah Freeman/ Michael Phelan, Nick Herman,
Rosy Keyser, Jutta Koether, Ian Pedigo, and Heather Rowe

Curated by Simone Subal

Stubborn Materials features eight New York-based artists who use materials in a paradoxical manner in order to reinvigorate the interpretive possibilities of abstract art. These artists place attention on a particular detail or an overlooked element as a means to reorient the reading of the work. Their formal decisions investigate the metaphoric and narrative potential of materials.